Thank your LA City Councilmember and Mayor Villaraigosa for Supporting Arts, Culture, & Creativity

Thank your LA City Councilmember and Mayor Villaraigosa for Supporting Arts, Culture, & Creativity

Fri, 04/12/2013 - 8:45am

Photo: advocate badgeIf you live or work in the City of Los Angeles, please add your voice to the chorus of “Thank yous” headed to City Hall and the Mayor’s office.

Arts for LA is coordinating the delivery of emails to each city councilmember and the Mayor as part of our work on ArtsDay, to be held April 17 at Los Angeles City Hall.

National Arts Advocacy Day Needs Your Support

National Arts Advocacy Day Needs Your Support

Mon, 04/08/2013 - 8:30am

Photo: advocacy in actionThis week hundreds of arts advocates from across America gathered in Washington, DC, to promote the value of public and private investment in arts and culture.

Budding LA Artist Wins ArtsDay 2013 T-Shirt Design Contest

Budding LA Artist Wins ArtsDay 2013 T-Shirt Design Contest

Fri, 03/22/2013 - 9:05am

Photo: Andrew Colunga's designThree local artists have been recognized as finalists by Arts for LA as part of our Arts Day T-shirt Design Competition. ArtsDay, scheduled for April 17, is LA’s annual celebration at City Hall of the impact of arts and culture on our communities, neighborhoods, and residents.

CD12 Strives to Be the "Creative Hub" of LA County

CD12 Strives to Be the "Creative Hub" of LA County

Tue, 03/19/2013 - 2:53pm

Photo: Nonprofit Arts Day Summit panelistsOn March 18, Arts for LA joined the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission on a panel for the District 12 Nonprofit Arts Summit, organized by Councilmember Mitchell Englander.

LA2050 Report Lauds LA's Arts & Culture Vitality

LA2050 Report Lauds LA's Arts & Culture Vitality

Mon, 03/18/2013 - 11:21am
Advocacy Team (if applicable): 

Photo: LA2050Los Angeles's arts and culture community is the only one of eight indicators "significantly enhanc[ing] human development" in the region, a new report claims.

The Goldhirsh Foundation's recently released "LA2050 Report" examines the overall health of Los Angeles by looking at eight indicators, including education, housing, and public safety.

Los Angeles Leaders Salute LAUSD for "Arts at the Core"

Los Angeles Leaders Salute LAUSD for "Arts at the Core"

Wed, 03/13/2013 - 11:09am

Photo: board members at Arts at the Core breakfastOn February 22, Arts for LA joined Arts for All and The Music Center in saluting the LAUSD Board of Education for their unanimous passage of the “Arts at the Core” resolution last October.

Spring 2013 Candidate Survey Archive: LA Unified School District

Spring 2013 Candidate Survey Archive: LA Unified School District

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Survey responses provided by each candidate are for voter information purposes only. Arts for LA does not endorse candidates seeking office. We are committed to fostering respectful, nonpartisan dialogue about issues relating to arts and culture. For more information, please read about our mission and values.

All eligible candidates were contacted to participate in the survey. If you would like to revise or submit responses, please contact Abe Flores at info@artsforla.org or 213-225-7526.

Elections for this city council are run by district, meaning voters in each district may elect one name from the district’s candidates. Voters may vote in only one district.

To determine your home district, please visit the Los Angeles County Register-Recorder/County Clerk website.

A runoff may be held on May 21, 2013 between the top two candidates who received the most votes in each district if neither receives a majority. If one candidate receives a majority of votes in this election, that candidate wins and no runoff will be held.

Candidates:
District 2 Candidates: Diaz, Garcia, Montanez, Skeels, Vazquez
District 4 Candidates: Anderson, Zimmer
District 6 Candidates: Cano, Ratliff, Sanchez

Question 1: What meaningful experiences with the arts (visual arts, dance, drama, and/or music) did you have growing up?

This candidate has not yet responded.

I have always been inspired by the ability of theater, film, music and art to tell a larger story of our world. I was impressed and influenced by Teatro Campesina and many of the poems and plays that came out of battles for justice.

As a young child I participated in Mexican folklorico dancing from the time I was 5 years old until I was 15. This allowed me the opportunity to learn about and express my culture in a creative manner. I also had the opportunity to learn two musical instruments. I played piano for over 7 years and I also played the violin for 5 years.

The critical thinking skills and ability to cognate interconnectedness between disparate disciplines fostered by the arts are far more important than rote memorization for standardized tests. For the record, critical thinking skills are essential regardless of what century we are in. This is why the children of the wealthy are exposed so heavily to the arts, whereas working class children aren't. Finding things that interest and captivate students is the key to reducing the dropout rate, encouraging students to find passions that lead them to college, etc. If we were educating the whole child in addition to providing wrap around services, then the achievement gap would ameliorate.

I started learning how to play the flute in the third grade at Micheltorena Elementary School when all elementary schools had full time music teachers on staff. Mrs. Rogan, the music teacher at Thomas Starr King Jr. High School allowed upper grade elementary school students to attend her summer school sessions, which I did. She was an awesome teacher. At the Junior High School, Mrs. Rogan also taught me how to play the bassoon. I was in the orchestra and band and had opportunities to perform in school and throughout the district well into high school. While in high school, I joined the Los Angeles City Youth Band and performed with the Youth Band in parades and concerts throughout the city.

I was very lucky to be surrounded by all types of art while growing up. My father was the director of the theater program at a small liberal arts college in Illinois, and rehearsals were my daycare. I myself participated in many plays, including playing Tiny Tim in a production of a Christmas Carol.

Access to arts education changed my life. I wasn't ever a good student and in high school I started struggling severely. One day my friends dragged me into meet Mike Mucci, the school theater department director. Mucci took a chance on me and cast me in his production of The Hasty Heart. The play ended up going to State finals in dramatic competition. And for the first time in my life I felt successful at something related to school. Theater gave me a reason to be sober and a reason to come to school. It taught me about team work and connected me to community. More importantly, being onstage gave me a release from a lot of the pain I was feeling inside. It gave me the chance to be myself and to redefine myself. The truth is that I wasn't all that good an actor. But it was important to me and I tried harder at that than I ever thought I could try at anything. I owe more to Mike Mucci than he could ever know. And I have made it my business on this board to make sure every LAUSD student has access to a Mike Mucci.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 2: What role do you think the arts can play in supporting key priorities of the district, such as closing the achievement gap, reducing the dropout rate, and preparing more students for college eligibility and the twenty-first century workforce? (Approximately 75-100 words)

This candidate has not yet responded.

Students learn and are inspired in different ways. It is important that students with artistic skills and expression have the opportunity to find this early on in their education. Success in one field, leads to confidence and success in other areas. Art can support student achievement in many ways. The most being in showing them they can succeed and become professionals in any field they dedicate themselves to.

The Arts are known to have a tremendous impact on the developmental growth of every child and have been proven to help level the "learning field" across socio-economic boundaries. Also, many of our drop-out students, drop-out because they feel “disengaged” and the arts offer students the opportunity to express themselves and interact with others in creative and innovative ways. Arts in the classroom can help us close the achievement gap AND reduce the dropout rate so that more of our students can graduate college and career ready.

The obsession with standards and punitive testing brought on by NCLB and its descendants RTTT and CCSS, have perverted and warped curriculum. Bringing balance back means resisting standardized tests and curriculum, and insisting that our students are provided rounded, culturally relevant curricula. While we still need to push for more arts and a rounded curriculum within the current regime of standards, ultimately we need to fight for curriculum decisions being made on a local level that addresses the needs of students. A nationally standardized arts curriculum further marginalizes children of color and those from different cultures. We need arts that are part of ethnic studies courses in order to respect cultural heritages.

In addition to nurturing students' individuality, creativity, and love of learning, arts education has been linked to improved student achievement and graduation rates. The arts reinforce the importance of problem solving, teamwork, and collaboration, traits required of the twenty-first century workforce.

Art can do so many things to support the district’s goals, including fostering critical and creative thinking and creating a more interesting and engaging school experience. Not all students learn in the same way, and I believe that art can be a wonderful way of teaching students who might not learn from traditional methods. Just as some students excel in math and writing some students are truly gifted in the visual or performing arts. By exposing all students to art early on we are giving them the tools they need to explore their gifts and stay engaged in school.

The Arts are the hook and the lever for closing the opportunity gap, eradicating the push out crisis, and graduating students who are truly college and work force ready. Like in my own experience students come to school for the arts. Arts provide the spark for so many students to value school and love learning. Arts are the lever that tips the scales in favor of differentiating instruction so that all different types of learners can acces the core curriculum.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 3: A standards-based arts curriculum is one of the five core subjects in No Child Left Behind and critical for developing job skills vital in the creative economy and the twenty-first century workforce. Yet, most often, only "what is tested is taught" in our schools. How do you envision bringing balance back for a comprehensive education and ensuring all students have access to a quality, standards-based arts education curriculum?

This candidate has not yet responded.

The truth is we have lost billions of dollars in funding. While there has been a strong push from the artistic community, we are at the bottom end of per pupil funding. As we continue to improve our schools we must also push for increased funding for the arts, and for recreational education and activity. This is not for a lack of will. But we must work hard to bring these funds back and make sure arts are on top or our priority list. I envision arts as part of the resources that come into our schools.

It is essential for the arts to be an integral part of the curriculum. By allocating time during the school day and providing appropriate and innovative curriculum, the importance and need for arts instruction will be emphasized and its importance a focus of the administration and staff. Due to the number of standardized tests required, a significant portion of classroom time is allocated to prepare for these. The number of required tests needs to be reduced. This will increase the amount of instructional time available for arts curriculum. Testing is needed to measure student progress, however, too much testing can stump creativity and innovation in the classroom.

Again, the de-emphasis in the arts in our schools is a direct result of national policies that have created an abject high-stakes environment where test preparation takes precedent over teaching and learning. I would work with all the stake-holders (who are natural allies) mentioned in the question above to create widespread awareness and outreach as to the critical importance of a rounded curriculum that sees the arts, including literature, as the primary, not secondary goal of education. Such a campaign would necessitate revising the existing LAUSD arts plan, which still sees test-prep as being paramount.

Excessive testing has resulted in a prescribed, narrow curriculum that places too much emphasis on the elements of Reading and Math that will be measured. Test administration is also costly. I believe standardized tests should be limited to those mandated by law and funds should instead be used to provide all students access to quality arts education.

As a parent and an education activist I do not support exclusively teaching to the test, in large part because art and other essential parts of the curriculum suffer. We need to at a minimum have one art and one music teacher in each school. My daughters are lucky; they have an art teacher and music teacher due to the fundraising efforts of their school’s booster club. Many schools do not have these parent resources. We need a systematic way to introduce standards based art into our schools. Insuring that there is an art teacher in each school is a step in the right direction.

One of the reasons I have always pushed back against the drive for high stakes standardized testing is that our students are not numbers or data points. The data and objectivity doctrine endangers all students because it strips away the beauty of teaching and learning. Inverstng in and prioritizing high quality arts education will help restore balance in our instructional approach. No one should be afraid that we will compromise standards and accountability. Anyone who has submitted a portfolio or been part of a performance knows there is no higher form of authentic assessment. We need to have the courage to fight for the things in schooling that are real education. The arts is at the top of my list.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 4: If elected, how will you engage classroom teachers, arts teachers, parents, and community arts organizations to implement your district's strategic arts plan? If you are not familiar with the plan, how can the district make the plan more visible?

This candidate has not yet responded.

We need more partnerships. I would love to connect with art and community groups to enrich the artistic experience and education of our young people. This is where local cities and non-profits can, and do, support our schools. But you are right, we need a strategy and a plan for it. I look forward to working with you on it.

It is vital for all stakeholders to understand the importance of the arts programs for the students in the LAUSD. Through a comprehensive campaign which targets exposure and professional development on various levels, the staff, parents, and community can learn the importance and value of the arts program for the students. I fully support the District’s Arts in the Core plan which is due by July 2013. This plan calls for, among other things, a restoration to arts education funding, a development plan to grow arts education and aggressive recruitment and support of arts educators. As a board member, I would encourage the schools in my District to develop their own individualized “arts education plan” that can be customized to their own school’s identity. I would advocate for partnerships and support from the arts community and college community. I would reach out to local museums and artists to serve as sponsors and advisors on the plan and to partner up with the schools in my District. I would also reach out to local college and university art departments for their support and collaboration.

Efforts to restore arts via policies and plans are laudable. However, so long as our public schools are threatened with catastrophic consequences like closure, reconstitution, or being handed over to a privately managed charter corporations, there is little hope that they will actually be able to execute such policies and plans. National education policy has created conditions where deviation from what is required on standardized tests is impossible, despite platitudes from the Secretary of Education on the importance of the arts. Board Members on the second largest school district, have a moral obligation to challenge the reasons why the arts, electives, vocational training, and anything outside the narrow confines of NCLB/RTTT/CCSS aren't considered important. In practice, really expanding our arts curricula in LAUSD would be a visible sign of resistance to the testing-industrial-complex controlling U.S. education policy.

I will review existing structures of engagement and ensure that all stakeholders are included, especailly those communities that stand the most to gain from fully funded arts programs.

Los Angeles has a vibrant arts community, which has the potential to be a huge asset to LAUSD. I would support creating partnerships between LAUSD and the many museum and arts philanthropic organizations in the city. For example The Los Angeles Fund for Public Education, has recently focused on the importance of arts education. I don’t believe the plan is visible enough; a way to engage teachers and parents is through having a school based information campaign to familiarize parents with the plan.

We have the best arts partnerships in our public schools of any school district in the world. In some schools we provide a world class arts education. But access to arts education can no longer be a privilege for the affluent and the lucky. It must be a right for every student. If re-elected I will continue to work relentlessly to ensure our plan is fully implemented.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Spring 2013 Candidate Surveys: Los Angeles Mayor Archive

Spring 2013 Candidate Surveys: Los Angeles Mayor Archive

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Survey responses provided by each candidate are for voter information purposes only. Arts for LA does not endorse candidates seeking office. We are committed to fostering respectful, nonpartisan dialogue about issues relating to arts and culture. For more information, please read about our mission and values.

All eligible candidates were contacted to participate in the survey. If you would like to revise or submit responses, please contact Abe Flores at info@artsforla.org or 213-225-7526.

Elections for this office are open to residents of the City of Los Angeles only. Voters may select only one candidate.

To determine your home district or polling place, please visit the Los Angeles County Register-Recorder/County Clerk website.

A runoff may be held on May 21, 2013 between the top two candidates who received the most votes if neither receives a majority. If one candidate receives a majority of votes in this election, that candidate wins and no runoff will be held.

NOTE: Due to a coding error, Eric Garcetti's answers to questions 3 and 4 did not display correctly. The error has been resolved and we apologize to Mr. Garcetti for the oversight.

Candidates: Yehuda “YJ” Draiman, Eric Garcetti, Wendy J. Greuel, Kevin James, Addie M. Miller, Jan Perry, Emanuel Alberto Pleitez, Norton Sandler

Question 1: What was the most meaningful arts and cultural experience you had growing up?

Carnegie hall, Museums, Art shows, Purchased some art collections.

A meaningful experience was when my parents took me to my first concert at the Hollywood Bowl. It was a majestic setting and inspired me to learn to play the piano and compose music. I still play and compose, mostly jazz.

When I was in elementary school, I saw Porgy and Bess at the Ahmanson Theatre. It was riveting. For the first time, I experienced the moving and transformative nature of artistic expression at its highest level, sparking my life-long interest in arts, culture, and entertainment. That’s why I believe that it’s essential to bring arts education back to the classroom so that all our children have the same kind of enriching and life changing experiences. As Mayor, I will support and promote LA's mosaic of art and artists for both the people of LA and for the millions who visit LA annually.

During the early years of the AIDS epidemic uncertainty was rampant, little was known about the disease, and young people were dying in large cities across the country. Stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS resulted in fear and silence among many. The AIDS quilt, created by artists as a memorial to so many that died, helped provide awareness and gave people a sense of comfort in talking about the tragedy. I will never forget the first time I saw just a portion of the AIDS quilt. The power of that message will live on with me forever.

I am an artist and received serval awards for my water color paintings when LAUSD in my hgh school years. Honored to have a my water color painting exhibited at the Music Center in Downtown Los Angeles in 1967. 1st major in high school was art. Also I enjoy when the school took our class on field trip to the Los Angeles County Museum. I have very enchanted with the paintings in the museum. I can vividly remember the school escorting our school class to the Shrine Auditorian to hear the orchestras. I adored the music. I also played the violin and the piano in recitals and the school orchestra. My family and educators would often mention that I was gifted in art. I guess I herited my gift of art from my father. He played the saxoplhone as a hobby and could draw anything with a pencil.

I have always loved music and dancing. My mother played the organ and taught us to sing. I grew up in a suburb of Cleveland. My family attended cultural events at museums and we enjoyed the Cleveland Orchestra. My mother took us to see the African Karumu Theater. I learned to dance by watching as a child and later remember being taught to Square Dance at school. These experiences were all meaningful to me. As a young adult I studied ballroom dancing and continue to take lessons.

I've always loved Latin Dance and was a competitive Salsa dancer for a number of years. It gave me the opportunity to travel, taught me discipline, and helped me in all areas of my life. I'm Mexican and Salvadoran, so I didn't grow up with Salsa. The hours I spent practicing were some of the most fun I had growing up, and that is an experience that should be open to people of all ages.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 2: What do you believe the role of City Council should be in the development and support of the region's cultural infrastructure?

Promote Art as a culture for Angelenos

The Mayor must take the lead role. We must make sure Los Angeles is always the entertainment and creative capital of the world. The entertainment industry generates hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars for our economy. We must make sure Angelenos young and old can access cultural resources to enrich their lives and enrich their competitiveness for jobs. I'm proud what I've done in my district, from helping restore the iconic Hollyhock House at Barnsdall Art Park to working with film studios to build new facilities.

The creative economy is among our region’s top employers, and the Mayor is responsible for supporting the artistic and cultural infrastructure. As Mayor, I will grow this industry to ensure that we are the world’s innovative and creative leader. As home to many thriving industries, we must foster that creativity through a supportive environment of economic development and job creation. As Mayor, I will promote arts education to develop interest and train our next generation of creative professionals and audience goers. I will build partnerships with local organizations and artists to increase grant funds to promote the arts in every area of artistic endeavor and in every part of our City.

The Mayor must be a public champion of arts in Los Angeles, as well as support and promote the diversity of our communities. The arts are a direct reflection of the region’s cultural infrastructure. It is the Mayor’s obligation to create an environment that allows the arts to thrive - through funding, through education, and through career opportunities. That means getting Los Angeles back on track financially so that our community can foster the talent of those who live here and want to live here.

Art is lke a book, it speaks to people through paintings, drawings, statues, pottery, music etc. This is why all over the world there is art to express what was taking place at that particular time and place. As Mayor I want to see more art displayed. The City of Los Angeles has an abundand of artist, but they just don't have a place to exhibit their gift. Many will write on private and city property to release their gift of art. As Mayor I will create a location where these artist may freely express what have in their minds and won't be punished. The City of Los Angeles needs more art. In this day and time everyone on the computer. I want those who are interested to get out of the computer to in the real world for a while and express themselves artically.

The Mayor has the ability to celebrate, encourage and support art and culture in Los Angeles from the smallest production to the biggest. Los Angeles is the cultural capital, rich in classical as well as ethnic culture. The Mayor has the unique ability to build cultural awareness, bridge communities with shared art and cultural experiences and to support and grow appreciation by seeking grants and leveraging resources through public/private partnerships to support cultural infrastructure in our city.

The Mayor and the Mayor's office should be actively involved in the organization and support for cultural events and awareness. This can mean anything from co-sponsoring events to making sure all communities are represented in city government. Unfortunately, that isn't currently the case. Many ethnic communities are overlooked and ignored. I will change that as Mayor of Los Angeles.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 3: How would you champion modifications to, or expansion of, the city's current funding stream for local arts and culture?

Provided, funding is available, or ask various foundations to contribute to this cause.

The city's major funding stream for arts is a 1% of the transient occupancy tax levied on hotel rooms that is directed to the Department of Cultural Affairs. Whether it's arts funding, books in our libraries or parks in our neighborhoods, we must realize that the revenues that support public services are generated by economic activity. My focus is not on how much to tax people or how much to cut services. It's on how to grow our economy -- tourism, manufacturing, small businesses -- across the board.

Los Angeles is the creative capital of the world, and I would expand the City’s funding mechanisms for local arts and culture. I will be a champion at the federal and state levels to advocate for arts programs. I will ensure that Los Angeles has a world-class cultural affairs department to provide critical marketing, arts education programs, and cultural tourism in Los Angeles. I am in the process of conducting an audit of the City's Transient Occupancy Tax 1% allocation to the arts to ensure that these dollars are going to the right programs.

In order to expand the City’s funding stream for local arts and culture we must restore trust in our City government. As the former Co-Chair of AIDS Project Los Angeles, I have experience applying for and receiving grants. Potential donors and grant makers are discouraged from Los Angeles because of our pattern of misusing funds and lack of results. Changing this culture and restoring trust in the way we spend our money is imperative to receiving the funding we need. To do so, we must have a leader who is independent of the special interests at City Hall.

I'm quite sure there many people in the City who adore art. I will champion the art by reaching out to these people who respect and adore art. People do not mind helping, as long as they witness where their contributions are going. In my opinion artists are pushed behind now days. I want to bring this culture back. I have nothing against computers, it is todays communitcation. But people should not get lost into the technology. As mayor I would want to invite the citizentry to come see the magnificent art displays. And I believe they will turn off the computers for a while and come out to the real world "art". When Richard Riordan was mayor, I noticed statues all around downtown Los Angeles. The statues had wings and they all were different colors. I thought was so beautiful. Every once an a while I see a winged statue. In the entire world on the continents there are exhibits of are pretaining the culture of that part of world.

The recession has hit the city hard forcing us to institute layoffs, furloughs and early retirement and reduce our work force. We continue to face a significant deficit in the coming fiscal year. We are not in a good position to increase the city’s financing for local arts and culture. I will work to forge public private partnerships, seek grant opportunities and work to leverage our resources for the arts. I have had discussions with the arts community about seeking a voluntary donation in conjunction with ticket sales for arts programs and I am willing to look into that as well.

The first thing I would do is ensure the City has funding period. Our current pension system is crippling our budget. Reforming the pension system would give the city more funds to direct toward local arts and culture programs. Right now those are being cut, and that's thanks to our current politicians. My job is to make sure the city has money and that it's going where it's needed. The arts are important and an we can't afford to continue looking at local arts and culture as expendable.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Question 4: What three things would you do to deepen the city's investment in its creative economy (cultural tourism, indirect and direct jobs, nonprofit and for profit)?

Promote our existing Art museums and other Art exhibits

I will continue my work to make sure L.A. fights back and remains the entertainment capital of the world. I will continue making filming in L.A. easier, reducing taxes and fees for creative industries and being proactive in recruiting productions to our city. -I want to boost cultural tourism. I will make sure L.A. is strategic in recruiting tourists from growing markets. Instead of current efforts that are inefficient and dilute our marketing, I will work in partnership with regional cities such as Anaheim and Long Beach to recruit tourists. - I will partner with the school district like I have as a Councilmember to make sure arts education is there for our kids -- to foster a love of the arts and in recognition of how arts education enhances learning in mathematics and other subjects.

I have a unique understanding of the creative economy because of my work at DreamWorks, working with highly successful leaders in the creative economy - Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen. First, I will reform Los Angeles to make it more business friendly, providing the right kind economic environment which will enable support of cultural institutions. Second, I will continue to fight runaway production and bring Hollywood home to Los Angeles. Third, like at DreamWorks, I will continue to create partnerships between schools and the creative industry, giving young people exposure to that industry and skills to help them enter the field. I will continue to push for training programs to involve students in the creative industry at a young age. Lastly, as mentioned, I will push to reinstitute arts education in our schools not only for its intrinsic benefits but also to grow the consumers of artistic expression of the future.

As Mayor, I would fight for private, state, and federal dollars to keep arts programs in the LAUSD. In order to have that fight, the Mayor must effectively communicate to the public the overarching benefit of arts programs such as career opportunities and economic benefits. I will also fight to bring entertainment jobs back to Los Angeles through business tax reform, permitting reform, incentives, and some unconventional ideas, such as the Los Angeles Production Benefit Model.

The City of Los Angeles is a World Class city and I know having exhibits of art, will surely attract tourism. As far as the City's investment, needs more researching.

I have worked to expand exhibition space at the Convention Center that will rank Los Angeles in the top 5 locations in the country. This will attract far more tourists seeking cultural experiences in the city and region and lead to over twenty thousand new direct and indirect jobs. The future of Los Angeles will demonstrate the development of new technologies that will support and grow the creative economy. I will support this new technological development in every way possible. As councilwoman I worked to vastly increase affordable housing opportunities and this included a set aside for artists. I believe in building mixed income communities and will continue to advocate for artists forging their way in our city and to keep the creative community living and working in Los Angeles.

We have to make our city more attractive. That means creating a friendly environment for potential investors, nonprofit and for profit entities included. We have to invest in communities and areas with the most need. Many of these areas happen to be ethnic communities with rich cultural heritages and vast economic potential. I grew up in these areas. South LA and the Eastside are ready to become strong cultural and economic centers. We just need a Mayor that will pay attention to these communities and invest in them. I'm that Mayor.

This candidate has not yet responded.

Los Angeles Election Results: Many Races Decided but Tough Run-offs on Horizon

Los Angeles Election Results: Many Races Decided but Tough Run-offs on Horizon

Wed, 03/06/2013 - 8:57am

Photo: City of LA SealResidents of the City of Los Angeles voted yesterday, closing seven races where a single candidate received a majority of the vote, while seven other races will move the two top candidate to the May 21 General Municipal Election.